My Favourite Selfie (2015)

My Favourite Selfie (2015)

 

ABOUT:

Australian-born, New York based Bonnie Lane has received grants and awards from the Rudin Foundation, American-Australian Association, Australia Council for the Arts, National Association for the Visual Arts, and the City of Melbourne. She has held solo exhibitions in New York at 80WSE Gallery and AC Institute, and in Melbourne at Anna Pappas Gallery, Linden Centre for Contemporary Arts, and BUS Projects. She has participated in artist-in-residence programs in Norway, Portugal, South Korea and the USA, including the Seoul Museum of Art and the Vermont Studio Center.
She has exhibited work at Chasm Gallery, Brooklyn; the Seoul Museum of Art Nanji Gallery; Art-Athina, Athens; MoCA Taipei; Atelier 35, Bucharest, Romania; 91mq Project Space, Berlin; YouYou Gallery, Guangzhou, China and Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center, New York, among others. 
Bonnie Lane is a 2016 MFA graduate from New York University and received a BFA from Victorian College of the Arts and an Honors Degree from Monash University.
 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

Through my active participation in and representation of both online and physical exchanges, I consider my current practice as an anthropological study into human sexuality.
My works are an observation, participation, reflection, and critique of the changing in heterosexual identity and desire as a result of the increase in online communication, the accessibility of instant gratification, and the decrease in actual physical contact.
My sources range from tinder, Craigslist, Fetlife, Seeking Arrangement, and OkCupid to original text messages, photographs, videos and emails given, received, and recorded, in what I describe as active exchanges with real life characters.
These engagements begin in my private life and resolve as autobiographical evidence that is indistinguishably interchanged with fantasy and fiction.
Materializing in an interdisciplinary practice that spans video, photography, installation, sculpture, sound, collage, short stories, and virtual and IRL performance, the works question prescribed gender roles by exposing private experiences that are coded with subtle indicators to ask the audience “who is watching whom?”